HOW TO ...

Build Your Own Ubuntu Web Server

  • To build your own Ubuntu Web Server you will need either an actual server, and old desktop, or you will need to create a virtual machine on your currently existing hardware and operating system (OS). Some of the virtual clients you may choose from are the following:
  • VirtualBox (Windows/Mac/Linux): Supplied by Oracle for Free and is Open Source.
  • Parallels (Windows/Mac/Linux): Normal pricing is approximately $79.99, but highly adaptable to your host environment.
  • VMware (Windows/Linux/Mac): There are many flavors of VMware. Depending on the version you choose, the pricing may vary from $69.99 or more.
  • QEMU (Windows/Linux): QEMU has a stable release for Linux and an experimental release for Windows. For Ubuntu server this can be installed during the OS installation, or after by issuing the following command:
    • sudo apt-get install qemu-kvm
  • If you would like to also install the QEMU virtual manager you may use this command:
    • sudo apt-get install qemu-kvm qemu virt-manager virt-viewer libvirt-bin

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Serve Multiple Domain Names on a Single Server with Apache Virtual Hosts

Apache is one of the most widely used web servers to serve web content across the internet. With its flexibility and power, Apache can support almost any web developer’s needs. With this power, Apache has the ability to service multiple domain names from a single server. This is accomplished with virtual hosts. Each virtual host services a specific domain, and points to a specific directory containing the web content it will deliver back to the user.

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HOW TO . . .

Configure Open-SSH Key-Based Authentication

In most cases, I use the normal password-based authentication with Open-SSH. Password-based authentication is commonly used in environments where the user or administrator is continuously changing systems. In this situation, password-based authentication is best. Considering this form of authentication is less secure, I reviewed a few of my servers, and decided one of them did not need this form of authentication. So I decided key-based authentication is the way to go. I set out to research OpenSSH Key-Based Authentication and its configuration. Yes, I like to do my research before I dive into things. So I fired up my Ubuntu virtual machine and began to Google. After reviewing multiple tutorials and system documentation, I noticed the many inconsistencies across the internet. I found Ubuntu.com to be most helpful, however their documentation still did not suffice. So here is my tutorial on configuring OpenSSH Key-Based Authentication.


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